A Shepherd That Leads

The Christian Science Monitor, October 17, 1991 | Go to article overview

A Shepherd That Leads


RECENTLY the New Testament image of Christ Jesus as a shepherd with his flock caught my attention. One special aspect that struck me as I read the parable in John's Gospel is where Jesus says that the rightful shepherd "entereth in by the door to where the sheep are, and "leadeth them out.

He leads them out! These days the idea seems to be to get behind the flock, see which way they're heading (via opinion polls?), and then hurry in that direction! Real leadership, of course, isn't a matter of finding out what the conventional thought is, then going along with it. We need to follow something higher. We need the real leadership provided by our "good shepherd, Christ, Truth. Think how Jesus illustrated this Christly leadership. Virtually all that he said and did ran counter to popular opinion. But his words had the spiritual power to break through conventional concepts. John's Gospel records, for example, that officers sent to take custody of Jesus returned without him, saying, "Never man spake like this man.

True leadership provided by Christ has its source in God. So, Christ shepherds us with spiritual wisdom and love. Even the most intimidating, complex questions in our lives find answers when we seek guidance from all-knowing God. As we pray and listen wholeheartedly for God's Word, Christ lifts our thought to understand more of what is already true about us as God's child. This helps us know what to do, which turn to take.

Christ leads by speaking to us in terms of wise, loving thought which, as we listen, gives us clear direction. As Mary Baker Eddy, the Discoverer and Founder of Christian Science, says in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, "Christ is the true idea voicing good, the divine message from God to men speaking to the human consciousness. …

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