Doubt Remains over Role Cantaloupes Played in Outbreak

By Scott Pendleton, writer of the Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 17, 1991 | Go to article overview

Doubt Remains over Role Cantaloupes Played in Outbreak


Scott Pendleton, writer of the Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


HEALTH officials believe that the rind of cantaloupes from south Texas was the source of the Salmonella poona bacteria in last summer's outbreak. "Bacteria are expected to be found on any raw agricultural product like a melon," the Food and Drug Administration says. Washing with water removes it.

But through improper handling by public food servers, health officials say, the bacteria were allowed to get on the edible part of the melon and multiply. None of the melons were available for testing, so there's no direct evidence either way.

Growers in Texas say that virtually all cantaloupes grown in or shipped through the state are washed with a brush in a chlorine solution that kills bacteria. The melons are stored and shipped under refrigeration.

"The largest state to consume Texas cantaloupe is Texas," says William Weeks of the Texas Citrus and Vegetable Association. Yet that state didn't experience the outbreak. Still, when health officials elsewhere first associated cantaloupes and salmonella, the state agriculture department tested trucks, 100 melons, and packing houses without turning up Salmonella poona.

As for epidemiological studies, "you can never be absolutely certain, ... but the results very clearly implicated cantaloupe as the source of the outbreak," says Craig Hedberg of the Minnesota Department of Health. Four separate investigations by state health officials came to that conclusion.

BUT Mark Fow remains skeptical. …

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