Practicing Christianity

The Christian Science Monitor, November 6, 1991 | Go to article overview

Practicing Christianity


IF you knew that Christianity overcomes discord--poverty, insecurity, sickness--wouldn't you want to behave in a way that brought this change into your life? We may not live in Christ Jesus' time, but we can still live by what he taught.

This isn't an impossible task when we recognize that Christ Jesus was teaching us about our own genuine identity as God's spiritual, perfect creation. As we begin to understand man's true selfhood more clearly, we find it natural to practice true Christianity to an ever greater degree in our everyday lives.

We can see, then, that Christianity cannot be molded and modified to fit various lifestyles. It is we who must conform our thoughts and actions to the example set by Christ Jesus, if we would avail ourselves of the healing, saving, blessing power of Christianity, which he practiced. Christianity has become neither impotent nor irrelevant, but we need to adhere to its standards-- standards that are essential to its practice and results.

Most people are willing to give up sickness, disease, lack, discord. But the supposed pleasures of sin may seem harder to give up. Christ Jesus, however, made it clear that sin must be rooted out so that healing can occur. And he frequently rebuked sin as well as healing physical ills. In one instance, John's Gospel records, he told a man whom he healed of a longstanding infirmity, "Sin no more, lest a worse thing come unto thee.

What it ultimately boils down to is not whether we are able to follow Christ's example in today's world, but whether we are willing to make the effort required to gather spiritual treasures. Christ Jesus counseled, we read in the book of Matthew: "Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

When what Christianity has to offer is more desirable to us than the unfulfilled promises of unchristly temptations, we will be able to make a start toward practicing Christianity as Jesus and his disciples did. …

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