US Denies Visa for Relative of China Dissident

By Ann Scott Tyson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 9, 1991 | Go to article overview

US Denies Visa for Relative of China Dissident


Ann Scott Tyson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE United States has denied entry to the daughter of a leading Chinese exile despite its stated efforts to reunite the families of Chinese who took refuge abroad after the 1989 Beijing massacre.

The decision to bar Hu Ainong, daughter of Chinese dissident Ge Yang, also contradicts recent attempts by Washington to push Beijing to grant exit permits to the families of "Chinese personalities" living abroad.

Ms. Hu has applied for a visa four times since August 1990 in an attempt to join her elderly mother, who lives alone on a meager income in Brooklyn, N.Y. The US Embassy in Beijing has rejected each application.

Ms. Ge, former editor of the outspoken New Observer magazine, has been forced to live in exile in the US since Beijing crushed the democracy movement on June 4, 1989. Chinese hard-liners have banned Ge's writings, expelled her from the Communist Party, and shut down the New Observer.

"It is very hard for me to understand. My mother is already 75 years old. She is alone. They should understand this," says Ms. Hu. US visa officers have treated her politely but have refused to listen to her attempts to explain her mother's situation, she says.

"I always thought China would cause problems for me. I never thought it would be the United States," Hu says.

The decision to bar Hu is apparently the result of a technicality in US visa-issuing rules explained in a March 4 State Department cable. The rules grant "sympathetic consideration" to the spouses and minor children of Chinese exiled in the US after the 1989 crackdown. Hu is not a minor, and is therefore not eligible for special treatment.

Given the restrictions, Hu is unlikely to receive a visa unless she can muster high-profile political support from US lawmakers, US officials say. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

US Denies Visa for Relative of China Dissident
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.