Bush, Yeltsin Get Better Acquainted in Weekend Talks Leaders Discuss Commitments to Democracy and Establishing Nuclear Missile Controls

By Peter Grier, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 3, 1992 | Go to article overview

Bush, Yeltsin Get Better Acquainted in Weekend Talks Leaders Discuss Commitments to Democracy and Establishing Nuclear Missile Controls


Peter Grier, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


FROM adversaries, to acquaintances, to perhaps allies: The American-Russian relationship marches on. Russian President Boris Yeltsin's whirlwind visit to Washington this weekend was chummy from the golf-cart ride to the communiques, and host George Bush acted as if he had finally put the memory of that old charmer and Yeltsin rival Gorbachev behind him.

Not that all that much of substance occurred. More meetings were announced, and both sides got a chance to explain their recent nuclear arms offers in detail. But the language was striking: Who would ever have thought a Russian leader standing on American soil would talk about shared commitments to democracy and economic freedom?

"Russia and the United States are starting a new relationship, and it's based on trust," said President Bush at a news conference before Yeltsin helicoptered away from icy Camp David.

There was a major policy point that surfaced during Mr. Yeltsin's US tour, but it first came up, not in Washington, but Friday in his speech at the United Nations. The move was Russian willingness to cooperate on some sort of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) defense system that would help protect the world from despots with nuclear missiles and at the same time strengthen US-Russian ties. Russian support strategic defense

Russian military officers visiting the US in recent months have said they were amenable to some sort of move toward strategic defenses. But they were speaking for themselves. In the US, Yeltsin's declaration was seen as a major policy shift that could have profound ramifications for the Pentagon's military posture in years ahead. At the least the quiet shift in Congress toward support for limited defenses seems sure to be strengthened.

Details were lacking, and in its vague ambition Yeltsin's global defense scheme sounded a little like President Reagan's old dream of a perfect astrodome Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). …

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