Farmers to Benefit from World Biotech Revolution Progress in Human Gene Tagging Will Bring Quicker Practical Payoff in Plant and Animal Breeding

By Robert C. Cowen, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 18, 1992 | Go to article overview

Farmers to Benefit from World Biotech Revolution Progress in Human Gene Tagging Will Bring Quicker Practical Payoff in Plant and Animal Breeding


Robert C. Cowen, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THERE'S a new "biotech" revolution under way that promises a big payoff for farmers.

It uses modern methods of molecular biology borrowed from the worldwide effort to chart the human genetic blueprint to map out the simpler genetic blueprints of plants and animals. With these methods, breeders can dramatically speed up improvement of crops and livestock without having to use controversial and highly regulated "genetic engineering" techniques. That's the message a panel of agricultural scientists brought to the recent annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Plant breeder Mark Sorrells of Cornell University at Ithaca, N.Y., told a press conference that "recent advances in biotechnology are having a fairly dramatic impact on plant breeding." He added: "Many of these changes ... are paralleling ... human genome research projects. They use the same techniques and often are applied in precisely the same way."

This is an important early spinoff from the effort to map the human genome - the set of genetic instructions that govern human biological development from conception to birth - in which the United States alone expects to invest several billion dollars over the next 10 to 20 years.

Genome instructions for people, plants, and animals are encoded in the chemical structure of long molecules of a compound called deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA. Coherent segments of DNA that control different aspects of biological development are called genes. The DNA molecules carrying the genes are grouped together in bodies called chromosomes. These chromosomes carry the genetic heritage that parent organisms pass to their offspring generation after generation. Precise mapping

What the genome explorers are trying to do is map the precise location of various genes on the chromosomes. They want to tag the genes with distinctive markers the way a "dig safe" crew tags underground cables with distinctive little flags.

The tags are DNA sections that do not themselves take part in gene action. They may be small repetitive sequences called microsatellites or other structures that biochemical probes can recognize.

Gene-tagging technology is developing fast to meet the needs of human genome mapping. That is a long-term project. The practical payoff today lies in the fact that the technology already is at a stage where rapid progress is being made in mapping crop plant and livestock genomes. This is what is beginning to revolutionize plant and animal breeding. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Farmers to Benefit from World Biotech Revolution Progress in Human Gene Tagging Will Bring Quicker Practical Payoff in Plant and Animal Breeding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.