Mixtures of Reality and Poetry in Latin-American Literature

By Marjorie Agosin. Marjorie Agosin, associate professor of Spanish, , and the editor of "Secret Weavers: Stories of the Fantastic Women of Argentina and Chile" . | The Christian Science Monitor, March 24, 1992 | Go to article overview

Mixtures of Reality and Poetry in Latin-American Literature


Marjorie Agosin. Marjorie Agosin, associate professor of Spanish, , and the editor of "Secret Weavers: Stories of the Fantastic Women of Argentina and Chile" ., The Christian Science Monitor


SINCE the publication of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "One Hundred Years of Solitude" in 1970, Latin-American literature, particularly prose fiction, has enjoyed a high degree of visibility and success, not only in the Spanish-speaking world, but also abroad.

Latin-American authors have also influenced the works of North American writers with a poetical style that mixes reality and fiction. Toni Morrison's "Song of Solomon," for example, and John Nichols's "The Milagro Beanfield War" both reflect this rich Latin-American form.

A Hammock Beneath the Mangos: Stories from Latin America (Dutton, 430 pp., $22.95), edited by Thomas Colchie, a distinguished translator of Latin-American fiction, depicts the vast landscape of Latin-American letters.

Colchie organizes this anthology from a geographical viewpoint: The reader is immersed in a literary journey that begins with the River Plate region of Argentina and Uruguay; Chile is presented in a separate section, followed by Brazil. The last section deals with Mexico and the Caribbean.

Colchie's organization is interesting and well thought out. It enables the reader to understand the intricate complexities and vast range of Latin-American literature, while it addresses the difficulty of finding a common theme that unites the writers.

Most of the authors - such as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, and Horacio Quiroga - are well-known in the English-speaking world. But Colchie also includes less-known figures - Armonia Sommers and Paulo Emilio Salles Gomes, for example.

Brazilian writers are seldom included in Latin-American anthologies. Their work is superb, and the selections here include such grand masters of Brazilian letters as Jorge Amado, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, and Clarice Lispector.

"A Hammock Beneath the Mangos" is an important contribution to the already existing Latin-American anthologies of short stories - one that will give readers access to classic writers' best-known stories compiled in a single collection.

The works of Argentine Luisa Valenzuela and Chilean Isabel Allende are probably the most translated writings by Latin-American women. Valenzuela's work focuses on the political history of her native country, the use of experimental language, and women. She is perhaps best known for "Other Weapons," first published in the United States in 1983, a collection of allegorical tales depicting Latin-American political terror and oppression. …

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