South Korea Sets Deadline for Nuclear Inspection in the North Seoul Aims to Force North to Halt Alleged Bomb Production

By Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 31, 1992 | Go to article overview

South Korea Sets Deadline for Nuclear Inspection in the North Seoul Aims to Force North to Halt Alleged Bomb Production


Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IN a test of wills with high stakes for Asia, South Korea has started a game of diplomatic chicken with North Korea over an alleged attempt by the North to build a nuclear bomb.

Even though North Korea denies the charge, Seoul has set a deadline of June 8 for the North to open key nuclear sites to inspections by the South. The demand is based on an accord the two nations concluded in February calling for mutual inspections of suspected nuclear-weapons sites on both sides.

"Until the last moment, you can't tell what their thinking is. That's why we have set a deadline," says Gong Ro Myung, head of the South Korean delegation to the new Joint Nuclear Control Committee (JNCC) set up under the North-South agreement.

The South is worried that the North is using delaying tactics in negotiations to allow it to finish a bomb, perhaps within a year.

"North Korean Communist leaders haven't yet changed their basic orientation," says Kang Young Hoon, the former South Korean prime minister who first opened talks with the North in 1990. "They say they don't have a nuclear-weapons program, but the {United States and South Korean} intelligence community are agreed that they have reached the final stage of producing a bomb.

"This will only heighten the tension on the Korean peninsula and in this part of Asia as well," Mr. Kang adds.

If the Communist leaders in Pyongyang fail to meet the deadline, officials in Seoul say they will likely ask the United Nations Security Council to impose sanctions against North Korea. Some Seoul officials say sanctions would greatly damage the North's economy, which declined an estimated 3.7 percent last year, the first fall in decades, which was caused primarily by a cut-off of aid from Moscow.

"The North's economy is very crippled. They will face bankruptcy with a boycott," says Tae Hwan Ok, director of the South Korea's Research Institute for National unification. "But they will never give up. They can survive."

While other South Korean officials say a boycott might be effective, they hope the mere threat of sanctions will be enough for the North to abandon its alleged nuclear program. South Korea's patience and the North's economy are both wearing thin.

Both Koreas are watching carefully the situation in Iraq to see if UN sanctions and the threat of US air strikes will compel Saddam Hussein to fully allow international inspections of Iraqi nuclear facilities. Last week, South Korean Prime Minister Chung Won Shik said the possibility of a US airstrike against North Korea's nuclear installations "must be averted."

"All we can do now is make sure they live up to their agreement," Mr. Gong says. "If they de-nuclearize themselves, it will definitely allow an improvement of ties with the South, the US, Japan, and Europe; and the North will benefit from trade. …

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