Capital Punishment: Should the Appeals Process Be Streamlined?

The Christian Science Monitor, April 8, 1992 | Go to article overview

Capital Punishment: Should the Appeals Process Be Streamlined?


The article "Capital Punishment Is on the Rise; California on Verge of an Execution," March 25, is very interesting.

Before the death penalty was finally abolished in Britain in 1969, a number of men were hanged whose innocence later came to light. The most famous is probably Timothy Evans, who was granted a posthumous free pardon by the Queen in 1966. There were others, though, like Walker Rowland and James Hanratty.

In my opinion, therefore, there is a strong argument for not streamlining the federal appeals system in the United States. I agree with the viewpoint expressed in the article "that no safeguard in the system is too much when a person's life is at stake." James Westland, Nottingham, England Judicial reform in Britain

Regarding the article "Britain's Chief Justice Promises No More Wigs, Gowns, or Cobwebs," March 11: The new chief justice and future Lord Taylor may be correct in his assessment of Britain's legal system and its need of reform, but changing the apparel of the judges does not constitute judicial reform.

Traditional apparel may isolate the judges from the community, but a certain amount of isolation is necessary for an impartial and effective judicial system.

Reform must come from within the justice system, and wigs and gowns will neither hinder nor enhance the workings of the law. Cash Marsh, Florence, Ala. Democracies in the making

The editorial "Telling America's Story," March 23, is right on target. For the past 40 years the United States Information Agency (USIA) has helped convince foreign citizens that a democratic system works.

Over the past three years, we have seen a new world of freedom emerge; and where democratic principles have been adopted, we are helping foreign citizens and leaders create the institutions which embody those principles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Capital Punishment: Should the Appeals Process Be Streamlined?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.