Issue of Missing Vietnam Vets Called Manipulative Myth

By Brad Knickerbocker. Brad Knickerbocker, a. Monitor writer, was a Us Navy combat pilot . | The Christian Science Monitor, April 10, 1992 | Go to article overview

Issue of Missing Vietnam Vets Called Manipulative Myth


Brad Knickerbocker. Brad Knickerbocker, a. Monitor writer, was a Us Navy combat pilot ., The Christian Science Monitor


M.I.A. OR MYTHMAKING IN AMERICA. By H. Bruce Franklin, Lawrence Hill Books, 240 pp. $17.95

THIS election campaign is proving once again that the Vietnam War - how one conducted oneself at the time, and how one's world view was shaped by that period - still is a very deep and emotional issue in the United States. And of all the complex psychological and cultural aspects of the war that remain nearly two decades after Americans stopped fighting in Southeast Asia, none has persisted longer than the question of whether United States servicemen still are being held as prisoners.

If anything, the POW (prisoner of war) controversy has become even more intense in recent years, despite the lack of any substantial evidence that Americans remain there against their will. In trying to sort out the facts and assertions, Rutgers University scholar H. Bruce Franklin concludes that myth has overshadowed reality, and that Americans over the years have been doubly manipulated: First, by US government officials trying to prop up support for an increasingly unpopular war by diverting attention from a corrupt ally not worth fighting for (the South Vietnamese government), and by directing that attention to getting back brave and mistreated American men being held hostage. Second, by the popular media - particularly Hollywood - which have cynically and deceptively reinforced an erroneous belief of many surviving captives through dozens of violent - and usually racist - Rambo-type films.

In "M.I.A. or Mythmaking in America," Franklin methodically builds his case on the record concerning the numbers of POWs and MIAs (missing in action). That record shows, for example, that "Vietnam and the Pathet Lao actually released or accounted for 15 more prisoners than the Defense and State Departments had listed as likely prisoners, even though both agencies had attempted to inflate their figures. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Issue of Missing Vietnam Vets Called Manipulative Myth
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.