US Mayors Organize Washington March Massive Demonstration Aimed to Regain Attention of Congress and White House

By Lucia Mouat, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 1, 1992 | Go to article overview

US Mayors Organize Washington March Massive Demonstration Aimed to Regain Attention of Congress and White House


Lucia Mouat, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A MARCH on Washington scheduled for May 16 may prove one of the most unusual and dramatic yet staged.

The nonpartisan demonstration will pit one level of government against another. The nation's mayors, impelled by what they see as a decade of steady neglect by Washington, are taking their case for a major shift in funding priorities directly to Congress and the White House.

"If the cities die, our society dies," insists Osborn Elliott, co-chairman of the "Save Our Cities" march. "The cutbacks have been brutal. They've sort of happened without anybody paying much attention. It's time for the country to wake up. The cities are the engines of our society. It's in them that the commerce and art and culture and medical science and higher education ... take place."

Washington's urban cutoff has been sharp and consistent. Mr. Elliott notes that over the last 10 years federal military spending went up $579 billion while federal aid to states and cities was cut by $78 billion.

The National League of Cities (NLC) says federal aid to cities and states fell about 60 percent during the 1980s. In New York City federal aid as a share of the city's budget dropped from 20 percent to 9 percent during the 1980s. In Boston during that decade federal aid was cut by more than half.

The cities now are "reaping the disaster" of such cuts in many of the increased problems they face, says Mr. Elliott, chairman of the Citizens Committee for New York City, a group that helps fund 10,000 local grass roots organizations. "These groups are fighting an uphill battle day in and day out against crime, drugs, homelessness, and hunger ... which in my view can't be won unless the federal government's resources are once again directed toward these problems."

Elliott first broached the idea of the march a year ago in the "My Turn" column in Newsweek, where he was once editor-in-chief. Last August he was invited to speak to a meeting of the United States Conference of Mayors, which adopted the project as one of its own. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

US Mayors Organize Washington March Massive Demonstration Aimed to Regain Attention of Congress and White House
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.