Wisconsin Leads Welfare Reform Regulations Cleared in Record Time Increase Work Incentives and Reduce Child Payments

By Marshall Ingwerson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 14, 1992 | Go to article overview

Wisconsin Leads Welfare Reform Regulations Cleared in Record Time Increase Work Incentives and Reduce Child Payments


Marshall Ingwerson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE first state in a new wave of welfare-system reforms has cleared regulatory hurdles in record speed as the Bush administration approved innovations in Wisconsin.

The changes in Wisconsin are intended to make it easier to move off welfare and into work by allowing recipients to keep more of their wages while still getting state aid. The reforms also remove benefits to recipients for having additional children while on welfare.

This move, and other plans in states from New Jersey to California, is in response to a growing consensus that welfare systems are not working.

Both Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives, are increasingly in accord that many state welfare systems contain perverse incentives that discourage moving into the work force and marrying.

President Bush strongly encouraged states to embark on such reforms in his State of the Union speech in January, saying that "welfare was never meant to be a lifestyle."

On Friday, Wisconsin was granted the federal waiver it needed to change its system in less than a month, drawing heavy praise from the president.

More than philosophy is behind these moves, however. Most states revamping their welfare systems are under severe pressure to cut their budgets. Most of Gov. Pete Wilson's proposals in California, for example, reduce benefit levels.

The Wisconsin changes will raise the amount of wages that welfare recipients can keep from $30 and one-sixth of earnings to $200 and one-half of earnings. The purpose is to make it more economically attractive and practical to take a job.

An irony is that it took an innovative Republican governor, Tommy Thompson, to raise these work-incentive levels. They were cut down nationally under the Reagan administration.

Unless states invest in job training and creating some workfare jobs, notes Prof. Sheldon Danziger of the University of Michigan, these incentives can only get people to search for jobs. They cannot make them employable.

"It can be a move in the right direction," he says. But he notes that, nationally, states are leaving some of their federal matching funds for job training untapped.

States have only committed enough money for training and education to cover about one in nine welfare families, according to the Center for Law and Social Policy.

Wisconsin is also attempting to remove any incentive in the system for bearing additional children while on welfare. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wisconsin Leads Welfare Reform Regulations Cleared in Record Time Increase Work Incentives and Reduce Child Payments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.