Furniture Firms Say Home Sales Buoy Industry

By Clara Germani, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 17, 1992 | Go to article overview

Furniture Firms Say Home Sales Buoy Industry


Clara Germani, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE Bernhardt Furniture Company is a picture of survival in one of America's most recession-battered industries.

"We've changed more in the last 10 years than during the whole 100 preceding years," says Alec Bernhardt, president of the North Carolina company his grandfather founded.

As the International Home Furnishings Market ended here yesterday tallies of new orders were not yet available. But January, February, and March furniture orders booked across the industry were the highest in two years, says Douglas Brackett, executive vice president of the American Furniture Manufacturers Association.

The upsurge parallels sharp increases in new home starts and existing home sales, key economic indicators for furniture sales. Mr. Brackett expects that the industry will have a 3.7 percent increase in sales this year over last, the first annual increase in three years.

During the past 30 months of industry recession, as competitors closed or merged, Mr. Bernhardt was revamping the family business. Changes he made characterize the future of the furniture business, say industry experts who were here this week for the largest wholesale furniture market in the world.

Bernhardt, as well as other furniture manufacturers, have moved to be more consumer responsive - the watchword at this spring's show. Those unpopular months-long waits for custom-order furniture are being erased with faster production cycles, Bernhardt says. And in an effort to meet the newly savvy consumer - educated in home design by a raft of new shelter magazines - Bernhardt has revamped his furniture line to a pricier, higher fashion product. Hoping to create exclusivity, Bernhardt's company has started national advertising and reduced the number of its retail accounts over the past 10 years from 8,000 to just 800. Coast-to-coast retail licensees of the family product are planned.

The changes are the kinds of modernization moves other industries have long since made but that this industry, dominated by small, old-fashioned, family-run operations, has been slow to invest in, says Bill Peterson, founder of Furniture/Today, the industry's major trade publication. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Furniture Firms Say Home Sales Buoy Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.