The Marathon Again: Running Inspired

By Richard J. Cattani. Richard J. Cattani is editor of the Monitor. | The Christian Science Monitor, April 22, 1992 | Go to article overview

The Marathon Again: Running Inspired


Richard J. Cattani. Richard J. Cattani is editor of the Monitor., The Christian Science Monitor


TEN thousand runners and wheelchairers headed down the seaward marathon course from Hopkinton to Boston again April 20. Ten thousand dreams enacted before hundreds of thousands of spectators, who cheered them on, reaching out with orange slices and cups of water.

Where does the inspiration of running a marathon come from?

Not from the huffing and puffing.

Those who do not prepare with regular runs of at least half the marathon course wash out early, or straggle in.

The marathon is one course with 10,000 races.

The best prepared may not be those with the best times but those whose race plan lasts to the finish.

Again, how does the notion arise to run a marathon?

Are the antecedents in watching the race itself, as do those of us who live in the hamlets like Wellesley that the runners pass through?

Is it in the recurring idea of movement? The body, after all, is built with a running gear, at least for most of us.

Is it the fascination with passing through some sense of barrier - represented by the sheer distance of the marathon, or the physiological "wall" marathoners are reputed to hit at about 20 miles?

The distance can be a measure of debility overcome.

Or just a run.

The first pass by in ecstasy; these are the fleet. Later come the labored, concentrating to keep each body part moving in sequence.

Friends, or buses, collect those who drop out along the way. The exhausted among the finishers are clad in foil envelopes; a colleague observes that they look like Eskimo Pies.

The race is covered on radio and television. Choppers overhead, motorcycles and cameras on the ground. There are the crowd shots. The struggle up Heartbreak Hill in Brookline. The finish dash in the Back Bay business district near our office.

The first few finishers hold their celebrity through the evening news; they will be on next year's video clips; they may go into the sport shoe business. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Marathon Again: Running Inspired
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.