Series of Earthquakes Rocks Northern California This Latest Quake Is Not Related to the One Last Week in Southern California outside Palm Springs. Humboldt County Is a Veritable Tuning Fork, with Scores of Small Quakes Each Month

By Scott Armstrong, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 27, 1992 | Go to article overview

Series of Earthquakes Rocks Northern California This Latest Quake Is Not Related to the One Last Week in Southern California outside Palm Springs. Humboldt County Is a Veritable Tuning Fork, with Scores of Small Quakes Each Month


Scott Armstrong, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE second big earthquake to jar California in less than a week has reminded residents of the perils of living in a fault-veined state, sent scientists puzzling over their seismographs, and underscored the importance of being prepared for a force that is both unpredictable and powerful.

Residents of rattled Humboldt County in northern California are cleaning up after a 6.9-magnitude quake that struck Saturday, one of the largest temblors to hit the state this century.

Two major aftershocks were reported early Sunday morning. The first measured between 6.0 and 6.3; the second, 6.5 on the Richter scale.

The quake was only slightly smaller than the 7.1 earthquake that rocked the San Francisco area in 1989.

A fire in a shopping district, gas leaks, and bridge damage were reported following the aftershocks, but no injuries. Highway 101 was closed in some sections due to damage. The logging town of Scotia, 25 miles south of Eureka, lost a market and hardware store.

Centered 35 miles south of Eureka, the quake caused widespread structural damage in the region's picturesque coastal hamlets, triggering rockslides and injuring 53 people, though few seriously. No one was killed.

Gov. Pete Wilson quickly declared Humboldt County a disaster area. The state set a preliminary damage figure of $3.5 million. Quakes not related

The quake struck only three days after a 6.1-magnitude shook southern California. That temblor also hit a predominantly rural area, in the desert just north of Palm Springs, causing only minor damage and injuries.

Although both quakes occurred near the notorious San Andreas Fault, scientists say the two events were not related. The northern California quake hit in one of the most seismically active areas in the state. The region is a veritable tuning fork - vibrating with scores of small temblors, usually less than 3 on the Richter scale, each month. Previous quakes

Last Aug. 17, a 6.1-magnitude temblor jolted the area. Less than three hours later, a 7.1 quake struck offshore. Only minor damage resulted from both. A 7.0 temblor was recorded in the area in 1980.

The latest shaker hit just onshore somewhere within a cluster of faults at the "Mendocino escarpment," a geological formation near Cape Mendocino. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Series of Earthquakes Rocks Northern California This Latest Quake Is Not Related to the One Last Week in Southern California outside Palm Springs. Humboldt County Is a Veritable Tuning Fork, with Scores of Small Quakes Each Month
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.