US, Japan: Times Change Japan Seeks Greater Influence in International Forums, Decisions; but the Process Will Be Deliberate and Must Involve More Self-Reflection

By Robert J. Carraro. Robert J. Carraro is program officer Affairs. The views here are his own. | The Christian Science Monitor, April 28, 1992 | Go to article overview

US, Japan: Times Change Japan Seeks Greater Influence in International Forums, Decisions; but the Process Will Be Deliberate and Must Involve More Self-Reflection


Robert J. Carraro. Robert J. Carraro is program officer Affairs. The views here are his own., The Christian Science Monitor


AS a further reminder of how much the United States-Japanese relationship is changing, celebrations will be held in Japan in mid-May to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the return of Okinawa to Japanese control. Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa is also expected to visit Washington prior to this July's G-7 meeting in Munich.

It is hoped these events will refocus attention on the positive aspects of the relationship and stimulate interest again in the touted "global partnership." But with elections in both countries this year, it is unlikely much progress will be made in overcoming perceptions of animosity.

Recent tensions have arisen from a sense of uncertainty over the US and Japanese roles in the world of the 1990s. Now that there is no longer a credible military threat to Japan, managing the alliance will be more difficult. Permanent American troops, 75 percent stationed on Okinawa, will eventually be removed from Japan. Competition for resources and market share and the equitable distribution of economic gain will be the main challenges facing policymakers.

Disparaging comments about trends in American society by Japanese politicians have led to perceptions in the US that Japan, with its financial strength, now feels superior to its strongest ally. This may be more accurately interpreted as a reflection of Japan's emergence from a long-standing feeling of inferiority in its relations with the US.

The Japanese are understandably proud of their economic and social accomplishments since World War II. At the same time, they are also aware of their image as a nation plagued by political scandals that has yet to find its diplomatic niche.

Japan has often felt isolated from the world community and is a nation with a long history of playing catch-up. It now finds that a larger stake and greater influence in global matters is accompanied by unprecedented interest in Japan's affairs. And many complain that Japan has not lived up to its international responsibilities. While Japan has been unable to successfully present itself to the world as a nation actively engaged, it is no doubt inevitable that the Japanese will, in time, show leadership and initiatives that demonstrate their belief in a shared destiny for all nations.

In many ways, Japan's domestic political structure has stifled its ability to offer leadership internationally. The Japanese system does not formulate quick or dynamic foreign policy. Previously, Japanese leaders have relied on gaiatsu, or external pressure, to unify moves on contentious trade and foreign- policy issues. But there is no such pressure from the US or elsewhere to force domestic political reform. …

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