Labor Law Alarms Ontario Firms

By Fred Langan, | The Christian Science Monitor, June 1, 1992 | Go to article overview

Labor Law Alarms Ontario Firms


Fred Langan,, The Christian Science Monitor


ONTARIO'S provincial government, financed in part by labor unions, has proposed a new labor law that business says would drive companies out of Canada's major industrial province.

The most controversial aspect of the legislation is that it outlaws "scabs" or replacement workers during a strike, making sure a company stays shut.

Other proposals make it easier to join unions, especially for people in service industries, from security guards to employees of supermarket chains.

The Ontario Labor Relations Board will be given power to rule on disputes between business and unions. But local businessmen worry that the board will go from "being a referee to a labor advocate," as one business group puts it.

"Many of these powers are extensive considering the board is politically appointed and is generally pro-union," says Neil de Koker, president of the Automotive Parts Manufacturers Association.

However, the government says it watered down earlier proposals to keep the business community happy. It was going to allow supervisors to be unionized. And it was going to allow unionization of a company if 50 percent of the employees plus one voted for a union. That stays at 55 percent. The government feels the proposed law is a minimum.

"It sets the tone for employer-employee relationships throughout every sector of Ontario," says Labor Minister Bob Mackenzie, a former union official.

Ontario is already more unionized than most parts of North America. "The level of unionization here is about 35 to 37 percent compared with 18 percent in the United States," Mr. de Koker says. In the auto industry that percentage is higher: 100 percent at Ford, Chrysler, and General Motors, and more than 50 percent at suppliers' plants.

The proposed rules on re-placement workers mean that unions could shut down entire sections of the car industry with a strike at one key supplier, de Koker says.

"This is especially true with just-in-time delivery {which means products are delivered only when needed}. …

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