Violence, Politics, and Complex Destinies

By Marjorie Agosin. Marjorie Agosin, associate professor of Spanish .. | The Christian Science Monitor, June 17, 1992 | Go to article overview

Violence, Politics, and Complex Destinies


Marjorie Agosin. Marjorie Agosin, associate professor of Spanish .., The Christian Science Monitor


ARGENTINE Luisa Valenzuela and Chilean Isabel Allende are Latin America's best known and most widely translated women writers.

Valenzuela comes from a literary family (her mother, Luisa Mercedes Levinson, was a distinguished writer of prose) and is used to dealing with the intricate complexities of language as well as Argentine politics. She has written five novels and five collections of short stories, as well as numerous journalistic essays. One recurrent theme in Valenzuela's writing is contemporary politics, especially that of her native Argentina. Another is the use, misuse, and abuse of language in order to oppress, control, and censor thought at both the personal and political level.

Valenzuela has been praised for her talent of combining the political, the fictional, and the real. Most of her novels take place in the city of Buenos Aires, where lonely inhabitants are victims drowning in their country's violent political history. But her latest novel, "Black Novel (with Argentines)," takes place in New York City with all its magnificence, poverty, and violence.

The plot deals with the murder of Edwina, an actress, by an Argentine writer in exile, Agustin Palante. The novel describes Agusts crime, committed apparently for no reason, except perhaps because he owned a gun. Yet, the whole narrative speaks of his consciousness after his crime, his guilt and his seclusion with his friend Roberta Aguilar - another Argentine writer who only knows the partial truth about the murder and Agusts fabrications of what could happen to him for a crime that has left no traces.

Parallel to Agusts story and the crime he committed is the story of Roberta, who becomes so involved with trying to understand and save Agustin from despair that the novel she is writing becomes his story. …

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