THE WORLD FROM.Wellington New Zealand, Pleased with a US Decision to Take Nuclear Weapons off Its Ships, Considers Rejoining an Old Alliance

By Scherer, Ron | The Christian Science Monitor, June 24, 1992 | Go to article overview

THE WORLD FROM.Wellington New Zealand, Pleased with a US Decision to Take Nuclear Weapons off Its Ships, Considers Rejoining an Old Alliance


Scherer, Ron, The Christian Science Monitor


IN commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the landing of United States troops to defend New Zealand, The Wellington Operatic Society has been performing "We'll Meet Again" and other songs from the 1940s this month.

Whether US and New Zealand forces will meet again is now up to the Kiwis themselves.

For the past eight years, New Zealand has been nuclear-free, a policy which has prevented US ships from using ports here. The Americans refuse to confirm or deny that nuclear bombs are on their ships.

As a result of this standoff, the US blackballed New Zealand from participating in the tripartite ANZUS military alliance with the US and Australia.

But President Bush's decision to remove nuclear arms from almost all US warships is prompting a new debate within New Zealand over whether to rejoin the 41-year-old defense pact.

"It is this government's intention to work toward the fullest possible participation in ANZUS, in alliance once again with our traditional allies," New Zealand Defense Minister Warren Cooper said on June 8.

New Zealand's foreign minister, Don McKinnon, says his party has a "commitment to improve" relations with the US.

Nothing is likely to happen until a government-appointed commission reports on the safety risks posed by nuclear-powered ships such as those used by the US Navy. Mr. McKinnon expects the commission to report later this year.

If the commission reports that the risk of nuclear-powered vessels is minimal, Prime Minister Jim Bolger is likely to try to get Parliament to amend the country's anti-nuclear legislation. This would allow US warships into New Zealand waters and would likely permit the country to get back into ANZUS.

Once New Zealand is back, says Defense Minister Cooper, "this country will have access to high-level intelligence, will train with the technology and doctrine that won the Gulf war and, most importantly, be accepted back into the military fraternity with our natural allies. …

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