Clinton's Choice of Gore for V.P. Challenges GOP `Baby Boom' Ticket Seen as an Attempt to Erode the Republicans' Electoral Base in the South

By John Dillin, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 1, 1992 | Go to article overview

Clinton's Choice of Gore for V.P. Challenges GOP `Baby Boom' Ticket Seen as an Attempt to Erode the Republicans' Electoral Base in the South


John Dillin, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


DEFYING the historical tradition of regional balance, Democrats will march into the fall campaign for the White House with two Southerners at the head of their ticket.

Bill Clinton, winner of the Democratic presidential primaries, revealed yesterday that he had chosen Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee as his vice-presidential running mate.

The Clinton decision throws down a daring challenge to President Bush and the Republicans, who see the South as their strongest base in the presidential race.

The Clinton-Gore ticket also presents a generational threat to the Republicans and to independent candidate Ross Perot. Both Clinton and Senator Gore are in their mid-40s. They represent the huge baby-boom generation born after World War II - constituting nearly one-third of United States voters - who are just moving into prominent positions of political and economic power.

Clinton's decision immediately drew both positive and negative assessments.

Tom Cronin, a well-known political scientist at Colorado College, predicted that Gore would be a popular choice. Dr. Cronin says Clinton, in essence, "breaks the mold, and does what is right, rather than balancing things out" for political reasons.

On the other hand, Theodore Lowi, a political scientist at Cornell University, and a native of Alabama, calls it a "foolish" move, an attempt to revert to the Southern-dominated Democratic Party of 60 years ago.

"The Democrats have deep roots as a Southern party, but they cannot win that way," Dr. Lowi says. He would have preferred that Clinton choose someone from the West, which he says will be the real battleground in 1992.

Even so, Gore's selection was immediately popular with many Democrats who know him and admire his close family life, his clean image, and his intellect. One Western Democratic senator says Gore probably is the brightest person in the Senate.

Although critics question Clinton's South-South strategy, others suggest that Gore gives the ticket important balance in other ways:

* While Clinton's strong suit is domestic policy, including education and the economy, Gore's burning interests are the environment, foreign policy, defense, and arms contol.

* While Clinton's avoidance of military service during the Vietnam War became an issue in the primaries, Gore, the son of a former US senator, served with the Army from 1969-71, including duty in Vietnam. …

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