Nukes, the Navy, and New Zealand

By William S. Broomfield. Rep. Willam S. Broomfield of Michigan is ranking minority member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. | The Christian Science Monitor, September 1, 1992 | Go to article overview

Nukes, the Navy, and New Zealand


William S. Broomfield. Rep. Willam S. Broomfield of Michigan is ranking minority member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs., The Christian Science Monitor


DESPITE a history of close ties based on shared interests and values, relations between the United States and New Zealand have been strained since 1985, when New Zealand's former Labour government decided no longer to allow visits by US Navy vessels if they are nuclear powered or potentially nuclear armed. In 1986 the Reagan administration cut off security links with our former ally. Based on developments in New Zealand and the wider world, however, I believe the time has come to consider lifting sanctio ns and restoring military relations.

The action of then Prime Minister David Lange's government precluded full military cooperation with the US, including under the ANZUS alliance among Australia, New Zealand, and our country. It also affected US interests elsewhere in the world, where the nuclear issue is often raised in connection with US military operations. That's because the US, for security reasons, will neither confirm nor deny the presence of nuclear weapons with US forces.

Despite calls for broader action, the response of the Reagan administration was confined to the security area. The US cut off military relations, including intelligence sharing, and withdrew the security assistance and arms-export preferences enjoyed by New Zealand under its allied status. It also limited high-level contacts on military and security matters. The US's alliance commitments toward New Zealand were suspended.

The US and New Zealand have had a long and friendly relationship. Many Americans became familiar with New Zealand during World War II and as a result of its participation in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. More recently, New Zealand lent logistical support and medical assistance during the military conflict with Iraq. Influenced by antinuclear activists, however, the Labour government provoked a confrontation with the US over ship visits, actually forcing the Navy frigate Buchanan to turn around enroute. No t content merely to adopt a policy that excluded US naval vessels, the Labour government enacted it as law.

In 1987 I proposed legislation that would have reciprocated for the actions of the Labour government by enacting the Reagan administration's restrictions on security assistance into law. …

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