Foreign Policy: Gulf War

By Grier, - Peter | The Christian Science Monitor, September 18, 1992 | Go to article overview

Foreign Policy: Gulf War


Grier, - Peter, The Christian Science Monitor


The Persian Gulf war is long over, but its repercussions are still important foreign policy issues. Was the Bush administration blind to Saddam Hussein's designs before he invaded Kuwait? Did Gov. Bill Clinton waffle on support for the war? How should the United States deal with Iraq's continued intransigence? Whatever their substantive differences, both candidates are trying to turn the powerful symbol of the grim, mustachioed Saddam to their advantage. BUSH

Points to his role in pulling together the anti-Iraq coalition and leading the liberation of Kuwait as prime evidence why he is the candidate to trust as commander in chief. Contrasts that with what he calls waffling on the part of his opponent: After Congress approved the use of force in Iraq, Clinton said he would have voted with the majority, but that he agreed with the arguments the minority made. "While I bit the bullet, he bit his nails," Bush said of Governor Clinton in his acceptance speech in Houston.

Says economic sanctions against Iraq should stay in place until Saddam Hussein is ousted. Has stepped up pressure on his Iraqi nemesis in recent months by declaring a "no fly" zone to protect Shiite rebels, and threatening renewed bombing if United Nations inspectors are blocked from doing their job. …

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