Mexico Finalizes Restoration of Ties to Catholic Church

By David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 28, 1992 | Go to article overview

Mexico Finalizes Restoration of Ties to Catholic Church


David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


MEXICO, the last nation in Latin America without diplomatic ties to the Vatican, has decided to re-tie the knot after a 125-year break.

Although some 90 percent of Mexico's 85 million people profess to be Roman Catholics, the church existed for generations as a virtual outlaw. Recently that changed, and the Sept. 20 move to establish full diplomatic ties is a largely symbolic capstone in a church-state reconciliation process begun when Carlos Salinas de Gortari became president in 1988.

Most Mexicans, according to various polls, do not see this as a significant issue. It has not provoked the kind of debate that, for example, US President Reagan got when he restored ties to the Vatican in 1984 after more than a century lapse.

"This is something symbolic which draws the attention of the international community, more than Mexicans, to the constitutional changes made by Salinas which are in fact far more important," says Roderic Camp, a Mexico expert at Tulane University in New Orleans.

But it is a reversal of historic trends and indicative of Mr. Salinas's effort to leave no stone unturned in his campaign to "modernize" Mexico - be it in terms of agriculture, trade with the United States, or religion.

Since the Spanish conquest in the early 1500s, Mexico has been predominately Catholic. The church became a powerful partner with Spain in the colonization of Mexico. The church owned more than half the territory of Mexico by the 1800s. When Mexico's revolutionary leaders came to power, they struck back at the Vatican for supporting the rich elite.

In 1857, Benito Juarez, one of Mexico's most revered founding fathers, expropriated all church property. In 1867, relations with the Vatican were severed. The Constitution of 1917 outlawed the church as a legal entity, forbade foreign-born priests to preach here, prohibited clerical garb to be worn in public, and made voting and political activity illegal for church leaders.

Over the decades, the anti-church laws were enforced with less and less vigor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mexico Finalizes Restoration of Ties to Catholic Church
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.