Political Analysts Debate Value of Polls Those Never-Ending Numbers That Seem to Drive Campaigns - a Letter from Washington

By Linda Feldmann, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 1, 1992 | Go to article overview

Political Analysts Debate Value of Polls Those Never-Ending Numbers That Seem to Drive Campaigns - a Letter from Washington


Linda Feldmann, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


READING about the latest opinion poll is like eating Chinese food:It's enjoyable, but an hour later you're hungry. So says veteran television reporter Marvin Kalb, one of a growing cadre of journalists, academics, and pollsters who are questioning the place of opinion polls in political reporting.

"I love them, but they do little to inform public opinion," says Thomas Mann, Brookings Institution scholar and co-editor of the new book "Media Polls in American Politics."

The problem is that the proliferation of polls has led the media to focus on the "horse race" at the expense of other content.

Varying polling results - the result of legitimate differences in timing, phrasing and order of questions, and sampling techniques - confuse and frustrate the public. They also can create a bandwagon effect and influence the way the press covers a candidate.

Polls can devastate a candidate's fund-raising ability, as 1988 Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis found out. On the eve of the second presidential debate, says Mr. Kalb, ABC-TV anchor Peter Jennings's reporting of the network's 50-state poll created the impression that he had no chance to catch George Bush.

After that, "the money simply stopped coming in to the Dukakis camp," Kalb says.

On the plus side, polling gives voice to the citizenry in a process that seems all too dominated by political handlers. Opinion polls also can help keep journalists honest by challenging conventional wisdom and "getting them off their bar stools," says Mr. Mann, speaking at a recent Brookings session.

Michael Kagay, director of polling for the New York Times and a contributor to the Brookings book, says that although the different results can be initially confusing, taking the average of at least five major polls on the same subject will paint a true picture of public opinion. …

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