Education as an Election Issue United Negro College Fund President Wants Pell Grants to Be Entitlement Program

By Laurel Shaper Walters, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 20, 1992 | Go to article overview

Education as an Election Issue United Negro College Fund President Wants Pell Grants to Be Entitlement Program


Laurel Shaper Walters, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


AMERICANS - conservative, liberal, moderate - all believe in education," says William Gray III, who resigned as the third-ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives last year to become president of the United Negro College Fund.

In the history of the United States, there has never been a presidential candidate who was opposed to education. "Where the debate really lies in this country is what's the best way to promote educational opportunity," Mr. Gray says.

He sees both incumbent President Bush and Democratic challenger Gov. Bill Clinton as strongly supportive of education. But, he says, "they each come at it from a different point of view."

Gray is aware of Ross Perot's efforts to reform education in Texas, but the independent presidential candidate has "mainly talked about the economy," he says. The economy is the key issue in this year's campaign. Yet education consistently ranks among the top five issues of concern in voter polls. Education top priority

In a June survey by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, African-American voters named education as their No. 1 issue in the election.

"Clearly, a presidential candidate who can show the connection between an investment in education and economic growth will be someone who will be very appealing," Gray says. He is convinced that such a message would resonate this year with American voters.

Although education plays an important role in every national election, Gray argues that school issues are more critical to this country in the 1990s than they have been for the last three decades.

"Suddenly the prosperity of the rest of us may depend on how we educate the least of us," he says.

The reason for this, Gray argues, is a "demographic revolution" now taking place in the US. He cites the statistic that 85 percent of all new workers coming into the work force in the future are expected to be women, minorities, and new immigrants.

"America's prosperity, productivity, competitiveness, and wealth are going to depend on the competence and skill of people that today we call disadvantaged," Gray says.

"If we don't begin to provide wider doorways of opportunities for women, minorities, and new immigrants then we're not going to be a global power in the 21st century."

One of the major barriers to the education of these three groups is financial access. "In the 1980s we saw a tremendous decline in opportunities for low-income people," Gray says.

While college tuitions skyrocketed throughout the decade, the federal Pell Grant program that provides aid for low-income students shrank, he asserts.

"We saw the government student loan program, which is really a middle-class program, mushroom in the '80s," Gray says.

Many students now walk out of their commencement exercises staring $50,000 of debt in the face. "If you're poor, you don't tend to go out and borrow tens of thousands of dollars to go to college," Gray points out. "So to tell poor people that we've got this government student loan program doesn't correlate."

Governor Clinton has proposed a national tuition fund to replace the current student loan program. College students could pay back their debt through working in community-service jobs, such as teaching or police work. …

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