Clinton's Foreign Policy If the Democrat Ousts Bush Next Week, America's Policies Abroad Won't Change Dramatically, but Some Shifts in Emphasis Can Be Expected

By Abraham F. Lowenthal. Abraham F. Lowenthal, founding director of the Aspen Institute's Inter-American Dialogue, is now director of the Center Southern California. | The Christian Science Monitor, October 29, 1992 | Go to article overview

Clinton's Foreign Policy If the Democrat Ousts Bush Next Week, America's Policies Abroad Won't Change Dramatically, but Some Shifts in Emphasis Can Be Expected


Abraham F. Lowenthal. Abraham F. Lowenthal, founding director of the Aspen Institute's Inter-American Dialogue, is now director of the Center Southern California., The Christian Science Monitor


WITH the United States presidential election less than a week away, and with Democratic candidate Gov. Bill Clinton still holding what appears to be a commanding lead, interest is intensifying around the world in how American foreign policy will be affected if Mr. Clinton is elected.

For three reasons, American foreign policy is unlikely to be radically altered in a Clinton administration, at least early on.

First, the Bush-Quayle administration significantly transformed US foreign policy from that pursued by President Ronald Reagan. On one issue area after another - Central America, third-world debt, arms control, narcotics policy, multilateralism and support for the United Nations - the Bush administration, confronted by the sea-change of 1989 and its aftermath, moved US policies toward those espoused by most mainstream Democrats.

Second, with the end of the cold war and the disintegration of the former Soviet Union, consensus is emerging on many of the key issues of the 1990s: the priority of economic renewal and improved competitiveness; the importance of environmental and population issues; the opportunity to reduce military expenditures prudently while encouraging greater burden-sharing with Europe and Japan and also strengthening the peacekeeping and peacemaking capacities both of the UN and of regional organizations; the need to overhaul the international systems of trade and finance in a liberalizing direction; the goal of assisting the economic growth both of the developing nations and of the former communist countries; and the goal of nurturing democratic politics and market-oriented economics worldwide.

Third, unlike in 1976 or 1980, this year foreign policy has not been much of an electoral issue. Nor are there influential groups of advisers around Clinton who are determined to introduce major foreign-policy innovations. The overwhelming emphasis of Clinton's experience and interest has been on domestic matters.

If Clinton is elected, he will introduce some changes of emphasis, however, and because the US is still so powerful, even small changes will have a global impact:

* A Clinton-Gore administration is likely to focus on global environmental issues and on world population policy, with the goals to narrow the gap between the US position and that of other major nations reflected at June's Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, to end the stranglehold on US population policy exerted by the anti-abortion lobby, and to foster consideration of stricter environmental measures, such as a tax on carbon-emitting fuels.

* A Clinton administration is likely to move further on arms-control measures, including a nuclear testing ban, and would probably reduce Pentagon expenditures at a slightly accelerated rhythm.

* A Clinton administration would probably be more fully committed to strengthening multilateral institutions, including the UN and various regional organizations. …

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