US Patents Issued for Two Transgenic Mice but Legal, Social, Ethical Questions Remain

By Robert C. Cowen, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 3, 1992 | Go to article overview

US Patents Issued for Two Transgenic Mice but Legal, Social, Ethical Questions Remain


Robert C. Cowen, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE logjam of patents on genetically engineered animals has broken at the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Ohio University in Athens has received a patent on a mouse engineered to produce interferon - a key component of animal immune systems. GenPharm International Inc., of Mountain View, Calif., has received patents on two altered mice. One has no immune system. This allows researchers to give it a human one for study. The other mouse is designed for cancer research.

These are the first patents issued in more than four years on what geneticists call transgenic animals. Harvard University broke open this field when it patented a mouse designed for cancer research in April 1988. The Patent Office has since received many animal patent applications. But it has been slow to act. Ohio University spokesman Brian McNulty says he believes other applicants also will soon receive patents.

The mice these new patents cover are research animals. The commercial market for them is relatively small. It is the agriculturally important animals that can be engineered to produce better meat, resist disease, or have other desirable traits that are the main commercial prize. If biotechnologists are to develop such animals, they need assurance their efforts will have patent protection. Thus, the fact that patents have been granted on research animals is "a necessary step in the evolution of this technology," according to Carl Pinkert, editor of the industry journal Transgenic Research.

Ohio University molecular biologist Thomas Wagner agrees. Referring to the mouse he and Xiao Chen developed, he said: "The value of this development has yet to be determined. Of greater importance is that animal patents with implications for human and animal health are issuing again."

The Ohio University mouse typifies the kind of transgenic research animal now being developed. The term transgenic means that an organism - plant or animal - has received new genetic characteristics that are transmitted to succeeding generations. …

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US Patents Issued for Two Transgenic Mice but Legal, Social, Ethical Questions Remain
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