Books and Politics

By Reese Erlich. Reese Erlich, a. freelance reporter, teaches journalism . | The Christian Science Monitor, December 31, 1992 | Go to article overview

Books and Politics


Reese Erlich. Reese Erlich, a. freelance reporter, teaches journalism ., The Christian Science Monitor


WHEN I saw Fred Cody one fateful day in 1969, the tear gas still hung in the air and the police were ready for vengeance. Tens of thousands of people had seized the streets of Berkeley, Calif., in an anti-Vietnam War demonstration, and police from surrounding cities had converged on the city. Cody was trying to mediate between the two sides.

He wasn't successful that day during the People's Park rebellion, but that didn't stop him from trying to bring the Berkeley community together. Businessman and political activist Cody, who died in 1983, is fondly remembered by a generation of residents.

Now his wife and bookstore cofounder, Pat Cody, has produced "Cody's Books: The Life and Times of a Berkeley Bookstore, 1956-1977," a narrative compilation of their letters, interviews, and magazine articles. The book chronicles the changing political mores of Berkeley, describes the rise of the paperback-book trade, and vividly relates the travails of owning a small business.

Fred Cody had a gift for descriptive and barbed writing. In a 1960 letter, he fumed about the building of the University of California (UC) student union, whose bookstore would directly compete with his. Cody describes the nondescript building as typical of "Soviet architectural genius. Indeed, it has no grace, no gaiety, none of the buoyancy you associate with youth and the longer I look at it the more I feel that the architects must have designed it originally as a recreation center for the executives of the Shell Oil Company."

In 1956 the Codys opened a 16-by-29-foot store north of the UC campus with a loan of $4,000. They sold only paperbacks at a time when large-bookstore owners sniffed at such low-class offerings. The Codys' business slowly grew, and in 1965 they opened a larger, airy store on Telegraph Avenue. …

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