Of Foreign Affairs, Politics, and Transitions

By David D. Newsom. David D. Newsom, former Us undersecretary of state, is Cumming Memorial Professor of International Affairs, University of Virginia. | The Christian Science Monitor, January 13, 1993 | Go to article overview

Of Foreign Affairs, Politics, and Transitions


David D. Newsom. David D. Newsom, former Us undersecretary of state, is Cumming Memorial Professor of International Affairs, University of Virginia., The Christian Science Monitor


TWELVE years ago, I had a ring-side seat at the change in foreign-policy teams between the Carter and Reagan administrations. I was the secretary of state ad interim for five days between the departure of Secretary of State Edmund Muskie and the swearing-in of Secretary of State Alexander Haig. On the basis of that experience and monitoring the news of the current preparations, I predict the two transitions will be significantly different.

The assumption of power by the Reagan team in 1981 was profoundly ideological. Foreign policy had played a major role in the campaign with charges that President Jimmy Carter had been weak in opposing the Soviet Union and in preparing the nation's defense. So total was the rejection of the previous administration's policies that, until the final pre-inauguration days, the new team did not want to be briefed on key developments such as the negotiations on the release of the hostages in Iran.

Free-wheeling members of the Reagan transition team traveled abroad to inform other countries of potential changes in policy - not always in ways ultimately adopted. The global threat of the Soviet Union overshadowed all else. The Reagan foreign-policy group was especially concerned with the reports of a Cuban presence in Grenada, the Sandinista victory in Nicaragua, and terrorist activities of Libya.

In the 1992 campaign, foreign policy was not a central issue. Dramatic changes in the world eliminated many earlier concerns. The differences that marked and complicated the transition in 1981 do not appear to exist in 1993. The transition teams and incumbents appear to be working together in a professional atmosphere. Although the new team will review past policies and, in many cases, adopt new approaches, premises and actions of the past have not been automatically rejected.

Unlike the Reagan group, Bill Clinton's key foreign-policy appointees, Secretary of State-designate Warren Christopher and National Security Adviser Anthony Lake, have worked closely together before - in the Carter administration and in the campaign. Little possibility exists for the kind of jockeying for position that marked the early relationship between Secretary of State Haig and National Security Advisor Richard Allen.

Because of the deep ideological mistrust of all those who served with President Carter, the Reagan transition team ordered all presidential appointees, including career people, out of their offices by Jan. …

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Of Foreign Affairs, Politics, and Transitions
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