Finding an All-Inclusive School Choice Plan

The Christian Science Monitor, January 21, 1993 | Go to article overview

Finding an All-Inclusive School Choice Plan


Regarding the editorial "Chelsea's Choice of School," Jan. 8: I am disturbed by the final two sentences. The editorial states that President Bush's broad-based choice plan would "siphon public money into private and parochial institutions" and "would undercut public education."

You seem to forget that such an all-inclusive choice plan is actually putting a free-enterprise type of competition into effect. Such competition can go from one extreme to another. You assume that the outcome would be in favor of private and parochial education.

It is possible, however, that public education in some places could become so effective that many students attending private schools or being taught at home would rather opt to attend public school. If we are to experience the full dynamic, catalytic influence on education reform that is expected from a choice plan, the more far-reaching and broad-based type is more likely to provide this much-needed impetus. Public schools will suffer only if it is allowed to happen. Eugene Henderson, Lacey, Washington Character education

Regarding the front-page article " `Character Education' May Become Need of 90s," Jan. 14: People expect schools to make up for their own failings as parents. It is not the job of the schools to do this, nor could they if they tried. What effect can courses in ethics have when students return home and see their parents cheating on taxes or on each other, lying to business associates, and flouting laws?

How successful can formal ethics education be when kids, ignored by their parents, turn to TV or the streets, where they see mainly examples of unethical behavior. Maybe what is needed in schools are not courses on ethics, but rather courses on parenting. Jeff Johnson, San Francisco The `look like America' Cabinet

Hooray for the editorial "Trial by Diversity," Dec. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Finding an All-Inclusive School Choice Plan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.