Clinton Adviser Sees Science, Technology as Key to Growth

By Robert C. Cowen, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 18, 1993 | Go to article overview

Clinton Adviser Sees Science, Technology as Key to Growth


Robert C. Cowen, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


SCIENCE and technology will now take center stage as the dual engine for economic growth in the United States, says John Gibbons, President Clinton's science adviser.

But he says he also realizes that getting that engine in gear and headed in the direction the administration wants requires facing some tough challenges.

They include:

* Hard choices have to be made about support for fund-hogging projects such as the space station and the supercollider project in Texas.

* Ways must be found to gain more practical benefit from basic scientific research without limiting its creativity. He says what he envisions is a better flow of ideas and knowledge from the laboratory to industry.

* The US must learn to be a true international partner, not just the dominant leader of projects it initiates. "We cannot proceed separately" toward some goals such as space exploration or curbing global warming "because they really are beyond our means," Dr. Gibbons says.

Outlining these points at a press conference at the recent annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Gibbons said he is involved in many aspects of administration policy discussions. He takes this as evidence that President Clinton considers science and technology policy to be "a keystone" in planning. Allocating funds

This makes the allocation of federal research funding a key issue. The space station is a case in point. It illustrates the strain that big-ticket items put on constrained resources.

Gibbons notes that the amount of resources needed to cover the program's projected future costs "simply is not realistic." He says that to proceed as now planned would "rob NASA's ability to do space science, aeronautics, and other things that are important to the mission of NASA." Yet to kill the project would break faith with its international partners - Canada, the European Space Agency, and Japan.

Gibbons says the final resolution of this problem is not yet in hand. But he did suggest that the space-station project will be rethought. NASA, he says, is being challenged to study the station's missions and see if they can be carried out less ambitiously and still maintain the agreements with the international partners. …

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