Business Says an Energy Tax Will Cost US Jobs, Jobs, Jobs

By John Dillin, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 22, 1993 | Go to article overview

Business Says an Energy Tax Will Cost US Jobs, Jobs, Jobs


John Dillin, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


PRESIDENT Clinton promised "jobs, jobs, jobs" during the campaign, but several major United States industries claim that thousands of jobs are threatened by his call for sharply higher energy taxes.

US airlines, which lost $4.5 billion in 1992, figure Mr. Clinton's new levies on jet fuel will buffet them with $1.4 billion a year in new costs. The result could be more layoffs and canceled orders for new aircraft.

Farmers expect energy expenses under Clinton's plan to climb by an average of $1,600 for a typical grain farm. Profits could shrink. Food costs could rise. Sales could drop.

Manufacturers of recreational vehicles, power boats, and other expensive equipment fret that their recession-hit industries will be dealt a severe blow just as they saw signs of recovery.

Vice President Al Gore Jr. says the energy tax package was designed with several goals in mind. At a Monitor breakfast Feb. 18, he told reporters that it will reduce pollution, discourage overreliance on imported oil, encourage use of natural gas, increase energy efficiency, and raise revenue.

But Charles diBona, president of the American Petroleum Institute (API), counters that Clinton's taxes, by singling out energy, "would seriously harm economic recovery and be a job-killer on a mammoth scale."

Mr. diBona says API studies show the energy tax "would reduce the nation's gross domestic product by some $170 billion and cost Americans 600,000 jobs."

Complaints from US businesses contrast sharply with the praise heaped upon Clinton's plans by environmentalists and energy conservationists, who share Mr. Gore's optimism.

"We're impressed," says John DeCicco, an analyst with the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. "This represents a paradigm shift in energy policy. It is the first time taxes have been ... justified in terms of energy consumption and environmental impacts."

Jane Perkins, president of Friends of the Earth, says the new taxes will lead to a healthier environment, while reducing America's dependence on foreign oil.

The Clinton tax would touch every American, and some industries clearly will be hurt. …

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