What Would Your Diary Reveal?

The Christian Science Monitor, April 8, 1993 | Go to article overview

What Would Your Diary Reveal?


A FRIEND--one who notes this kind of thing--recently told me something about diaries that I found intriguing. Diary entries of teenage girls after about the 1950s focused largely on their relationship with boys. But similar diary entries in the eighteeneth century focused largely on the girls' relationship to God! Of course, such an observation doesn't mean that people today, teenage girls included, don't think about their relationship to God. Neither does it mean that all those in the eighteenth centurythought exclusively about Him and never about their relationship to other people. But I found some food for thought in this tidbit of information. We all keep mental "diaries"--places where we store precious thoughts, our most heartfelt aspirations, our deepest hopes.

For someone's hopes and aspirations, or thoughts about life, to focus on his or her relationship to God is very significant. We could never go wrong keeping God at the focal point of our thinking. As the Bible says in Psalms, "How precious also are thy thoughts unto me, O God! how great is the sum of them!" If we keep God at the center of our thinking--if we insist on making our spiritual relationship to Him the most important and satisfying entry in our mental diaries each day--then our thoughts can be a constant treasure to us.

Christ Jesus gives us wonderful counsel concerning this spiritual treasure. He urges, as Matthew's Gospel tells us, "Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also." Treasures in heaven, then, would be thoughts of God and His goodness as the center of our lives, while "treasures upon earth might be fears, resentments, dissatisfactions, and the like. …

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