British Newspaper `Heavies' Gain as Tabloids Lose Readers, Serious Sunday Journals Show New Vigor

By Alexander MacLeod, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 12, 1993 | Go to article overview

British Newspaper `Heavies' Gain as Tabloids Lose Readers, Serious Sunday Journals Show New Vigor


Alexander MacLeod, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE landscape of what the world used to call Fleet Street is being jolted and reshaped by a mix of economic and high-tech factors.

But in an age when many sections of the media are heading "down market" in the naked pursuit of profits, there are signs that the forces of change are producing some beneficial effects.

The most encouraging development is clear evidence of vigor among Britain's "quality" Sunday papers. A decade after newspaper publishers began fleeing the famous "Street of Ink" to premises on the fringe of London, serious readers are reaping the benefits of the revolution.

Brian MacArthur, a leading commentator on media trends, notes that except for the 202-year-old Observer, the so-called "heavies" of the Sunday press are on an upward circulation curve. By contrast, most mass-market daily and Sunday titles are in circulation decline.

Mr. MacArthur forecasts that the ailing Observer, which last month was saved from closure when it was purchased by the daily Guardian newspaper, will benefit from injections of cash and fresh ideas from its new proprietor.

If the world's oldest Sunday paper - it reported the death of Mozart - manages to stage a successful comeback, British readers will be able to choose from four high-grade Sunday titles. Faced with the Sunday Times, Sunday Telegraph, the Independent on Sunday, and the Observer, many will buy more than one, and some readers will buy them all.

Charles Wintour, author of "The Rise and Fall of Fleet Street," describes the British as "a nation of voracious newspaper readers," and the figures bear him out.

Every weekday, Britons buy nearly 14 million nationally circulating newspapers. On Sundays, the figure rises to around 16 million. In British cities, towns, and villages on Sunday mornings, men and women trudging home from newsagents and corner stores laden with several papers are a common sight.

According to MacArthur, economic recession has cut deeply into the tabloid market and handed an advantage to the serious Sunday press. He says that on weekends people look for "a good read" and are more likely to find it in the quality press than in mass-circulation papers that emphasize sex and scandal.

When it moved to London's dockland seven years ago, the Sunday Times, owned by Rupert Murdoch, took full advantage of new, more spacious premises and technology that made it possible to produce multisection newspapers on the American pattern. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

British Newspaper `Heavies' Gain as Tabloids Lose Readers, Serious Sunday Journals Show New Vigor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.