Palestinians Want Aid for Mideast Peace Economic Development Is `Support System' for Process

By Amy Kaslow, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 14, 1993 | Go to article overview

Palestinians Want Aid for Mideast Peace Economic Development Is `Support System' for Process


Amy Kaslow, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


FOR Palestinian representatives at the Mideast peace talks, addressing economic issues has become essential to resolving territorial disputes.

While they are anxious to achieve "concrete results," including self-rule in the Israeli-occupied territories, they are also eager for economic rewards based on their participation in the peace process and resulting accords.

But while the West is responding with aid, Palestinians are critical of the way it is being delivered and Gulf states are reluctant to ante up.

"I call economic development the support system for the peace process," says Saeb Erakat, vice-chairman of the Palestinian delegation and a politics professor at An-Najah University in Nablus, on the West Bank. "How can you negotiate, after all, when the economic atmosphere in the occupied territories is so poor?"

Washington, the host for the talks, has worked hard to keep the process on track. Last week, the United States State Department announced plans to transfer $14 million directly to the West Bank and Gaza to help create job opportunities for Palestinians. Encouraged by the US, the European Community pledged another $6 million. And in late April, the US asked Saudi Arabia - the Palestinians' greatest benefactor in the past - to resume financial aid to the Palestinians to help ensure their return to the negotiations table.

In order to maintain momentum, the US will follow through quickly on its commitment, says Peter Gubser, president of American Near East Refugee Aid, a nongovernmental organization that administers economic and social development projects in the West Bank, Gaza, and other areas in the Middle East. "The Americans want to spend it as quickly and as soberly as possible, and they are contacting groups that work in the area," he says.

BUT Mr. Erakat says the assistance is misplaced. The donors, he says, "want to create more cheap labor, but we have no money to cover the operating costs of our institutions - our universities, hospitals, churches, and youth organizations."

A United Nations report issued Monday points to dire conditions among Palestinians living in the territories. According to the UN Development Program (UNDP), their income has fallen 36 percent over the past five years, and unemployment has jumped to 40 percent. It also cited "a gross negligence of infrastructure."

The UNDP attributes the decline to economic disruptions caused by the Palestinian-organized uprising (intifadah) against Israel, the loss of roughly $450 million in remittances from Palestinian workers who were expelled from other Gulf states during the Gulf war, and some $750 million in aid cuts by Arab donors who were were angered by the Palestinian Liberation Organization's (PLO) strong endorsement of Iraq in the Gulf war. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Palestinians Want Aid for Mideast Peace Economic Development Is `Support System' for Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.