Women's Rights, `Universality' Gain at UN Rights Conference Reaction to World Conflicts Threatens to Undo Progress on Rights Declaration

By Christopher Reardon, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 25, 1993 | Go to article overview

Women's Rights, `Universality' Gain at UN Rights Conference Reaction to World Conflicts Threatens to Undo Progress on Rights Declaration


Christopher Reardon, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


FOLLOWING a two-year campaign to place their concerns on the agenda, women's rights activists have emerged as the surest winners at the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, which concludes today.

Nevertheless, reaction to the conflicts in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Angola threatens to undo some of women's gains by casting doubt on whether the conference will produce a final declaration. Yesterday 52 Islamic nations said they would not sign the declaration unless the conference also adopted a document condemning Serbian aggression in Bosnia. A group of African nations took a similar stand on Angola.

"To end in a stalemate would be a terrible shame and a great loss for women," says Lael Stegall, one of nearly 1,000 women's rights activists at the conference. "But we won't give up here."

At stake for women are several recommendations in the draft declaration that would strengthen the UN's ability to protect women from human rights abuses. They include considering the appointment of a Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women and calling on the UN to strengthen the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). A third proposal urges the UN to integrate women's rights in all of its activities.

Others who stand to lose if the declaration is not adopted include indigenous people, who won support for preparing a declaration affirming their rights to land and self-determination. As the conference draws to a close, they and nearly 3,000 other activists are making their final pleas to government delegates for a binding commitment to protect human rights, an outcome most participants consider unlikely.

Unlike many issues under consideration, such as whether developing countries will agree to accept the universality of human rights, the recommendations on women's rights passed the drafting committee without objection. Declaration or no, as women's rights activists continue to chip away at the wall of privacy that shields many male abusers from prosecution, governments may soon have to reckon with gender-specific forms of abuse. …

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