Croat and Serb Froces Appear to Fight Together

By Baldauf, Scott | The Christian Science Monitor, July 1, 1993 | Go to article overview

Croat and Serb Froces Appear to Fight Together


Baldauf, Scott, The Christian Science Monitor


MUSLIM-LED government troops apparently tried to counter fierce attacks by combined Croat and Serb forces yesterday in a key cluster of cities northwest of Sarajevo.

It was unclear if they succeeded.

Fighting was "extremely grave" around Muslim-dominated Novi Seher, government-controlled Bosnian radio reported Tuesday night.

It said the town had been under intense attack from Bosnian Croat forces backed by Serb artillery, and that refugees were streaming south. The town is southwest of Maglaj, the scene of some of the heaviest recent fighting.

A British officer with a United Nations peacekeeping unit, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Croat and Serb forces appeared to be coordinating a "pincer action" against Maglaj from the east and west.

Bosnian radio also reported more fighting in Mostar, in southwestern Bosnia. The radio said the Muslim government's Army had captured the Croats' northern camp in Mostar, taking many prisoners. There was no independent confirmation.

Croats and Muslim-led government troops fought together against rebel Serbs at the start of the war. But their increasingly shaky alliance has all but collapsed in recent fighting for central Bosnian territory. Bosnian Serbs control about 70 percent of the country, and Croats hold most of the rest. Rebel Azeri Is Premier

The Azeri parliament yesterday elected rebel leader Suret Guseinov as prime minister, less than two weeks after his forces chased popularly elected President Abulfaz Elchibey from power. Mr. Guseinov will also gain direct control of the defense, interior, and national security ministries.

The 35-year-old former Army colonel and wool merchant won approval in the 51-member parliament with 35 votes.

Even members of fugitive President Elchibey's Popular Front, who protested against the nomination, ended up voting for Guseinov. …

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Croat and Serb Froces Appear to Fight Together
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