Safe Travel in Love

The Christian Science Monitor, July 1, 1993 | Go to article overview

Safe Travel in Love


NEWS media reports of carjackings in the United States and of assaults on travelers often create an atmosphere of fear and anxiety. Yet we are not helpless before such accounts--as I discovered some months ago. I was planning a trip through an area that was rapidly becoming notorious for the prevalence of carjackings. As a woman traveling alone, I found the news reports frightening. But instead of giving up the trip, I turned to God in prayer.

One of the thoughts that came to me immediately was the fact that God, good, is omnipresent. So God wouldn't be any less present with me when I was on my trip than He was when I was at home. The Bible's many accounts of travelers' communications with God show that these people learned that they were never outside of God's care. Abraham, Jacob, Moses, Elijah, and Elisha had many experiences of God's guiding presence as well as His protection. Elisha, for instance, was once in a city that was surrounded by enemy soldiers who had been sent to capture him. Yet through his reliance on God, he was able to escape. Christ Jesus' disciples and the Apostle Paul also learned of God's care for them--whether they were striving with enemies or facing storms at sea.

In fact, even though Biblical figures may not have had to deal with carjackers and muggers, they knew well what it was to be in danger. And their certainty of God's presence sustained them. Perhaps the Psalmist stated this most effectively when he sang, "Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or whither shall I flee from thy presence? . . . If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me. If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me."

These thoughts reminded me that man is inseparable from God and also that this unbreakable relationship is ours now. …

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