Huge Toll from South Asia Floods Tied to Environmental Degradation Effects of Deforestation Devastate India, Nepal, and Bangladesh

By Patralekha Chatterjee, Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 29, 1993 | Go to article overview

Huge Toll from South Asia Floods Tied to Environmental Degradation Effects of Deforestation Devastate India, Nepal, and Bangladesh


Patralekha Chatterjee, Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


ACROSS South Asia, floods caused by torrential rains are drowning farmers and their cattle, tearing roofs from rafters, and sweeping virtually everything away.

The torrents that have killed nearly 3,000 people in three countries in South Asia in the last four weeks have been exacerbated by human development, particularly deforestation, some experts say.

Punjab - India's breadbasket and one of its most prosperous states - has been especially hard hit. Nearly 2,600 villages in Punjab and the neighboring state of Haryana have been inundated, and crops worth millions of dollars have been damaged.

Indian Air Force helicopters are dropping food packets on marooned villages, and the Army has been called out to lead relief efforts. But even though life in northern India is limping back to normal, rivers in eastern India continue to run above flood stage. In the northeast, vital rail links have been breached, cutting some parts of the region off from the rest of the country.

As in the United States, vast tracts of agricultural land have been damaged, crops destroyed, and bridges washed out.

The irony is that, though South Asia is not unfamiliar with natural disasters, little has been done here in the way of disaster prevention.

In India, floods traditionally pose a serious problem in thickly populated states like Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, and Assam. According to official estimates, an average of 8.2 million acres of land are flooded annually. But a systematic approach to flood prevention is still missing. As Terry Jeggle, director of the Bangkok based Asian Disaster Preparedness center put it in a recent workshop here, "More money is put into providing relief than in prevention measures, because relief is politically more popular."

In the wake of the recent floods in India, Agriculture Minister Balram Jakhar announced that he would recommend larger sums for the states to deal with natural calamities. Mr. Jakhar conceded that lack of funds was affecting relief work. Only recently has the Indian government realized the urgency of working out a comprehensive policy to control floods. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Huge Toll from South Asia Floods Tied to Environmental Degradation Effects of Deforestation Devastate India, Nepal, and Bangladesh
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.