Baseball Owners Fail to Agree on Pooling Funds Small-Market Teams Seek Major League Financial Support to Survive

By Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 16, 1993 | Go to article overview

Baseball Owners Fail to Agree on Pooling Funds Small-Market Teams Seek Major League Financial Support to Survive


Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


HEADING into important contract talks with players, the owners of Major League Baseball's 28 teams still face a simmering conflict among themselves.

In a marathon two-day meeting last week, owners of teams in big-city markets could not work out a deal with their small-market peers to pool more of their revenue. Such an agreement is seen as crucial for financially struggling teams from small cities where local television revenue is hard to come by.

For a professional sport in which owners have historically wielded monarchical power over their own teams, the meeting was remarkable in itself.

"It seems like the first time they've really tried to air their views," says Andrew Zimbalist, a Smith College economist who wrote a book on the sport from a business perspective. "I was skeptical all along that they would come up with anything."

Such meetings should have begun months ago, Professor Zimbalist adds, since greater revenue-sharing was one of the central recommendations last year of a commission sponsored by players and owners after a 1990 contract dispute.

The major league owners already pool money from national television broadcasts, but only one-fourth or less of the revenue from local broadcasts or ticket sales is shared. This has created wide income gaps between small-city teams such as the Seattle Mariners and big-market rivals. Any new system must be approved by three-fourths of the teams.

"If the big guys think they can survive without the small guys, then I think they're wrong," says Christopher Cameron, a labor-law expert at Southwestern University School of Law in Los Angeles. To the degree that a failure to expand revenue-sharing causes the game to lose popular appeal, the big-market owners will be hurting themselves by not giving up a little more money, he argues.

Fans of the San Diego Padres, for example, have become embittered as their team has sold star players to cut costs.

Income-rich clubs have pushed up overall salary levels, making it even harder for small-market teams to keep up, says Milwaukee Brewers general manager Sal Bando.

A group of 10 big-market teams met in a caucus by themselves for most of the meeting near Milwaukee and failed to agree to increased sharing. …

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