Prayer - Even at Vacation Time

The Christian Science Monitor, August 18, 1993 | Go to article overview

Prayer - Even at Vacation Time


IN Europe, throughout most of August many communities practically shut down because such a vast number of people go on vacation. Yet there is often quite a contrast between the excitement and anticipation preceding a vacation, when everyone is bright and cheerful, and the rush and demands of actually departing for the vacation, when people might be arguing or feeling thoroughly exhausted.

Do vacations always have to be exercises in stressfulness? For some who've never taken one, that might seem like a foolish question. How could relaxation, ease, and entertainment be stressful? Yet people's expectations of holidays, and especially of one another, are sometimes so high that the smallest difficulty or slightest less-than-loving comment can seem to "ruin everything." And whether you're sitting in a traffic jam for three hours trying to get out of the city; waiting in an airport because your flight has been delayed, canceled, or you've just plain missed it; or spending hours driving a car while your kids are driving you crazy, there is certainly a need for overcoming stress!

Do you know, though, that peace is always available to us? That we have instant access to calm--even when plans, events, and modes of transport go haywire? This peace has its source in God. In the face of stress, we can turn to the oasis of good that God supplies. God is our creator, and we can never be separated from Him. You and I are actually His spiritual reflection. Peace, poise, and grace are Christ's, Truth's, constant gifts to us.

Christ Jesus surely knew the availability and value of true peace. Some of his words to his disciples were, "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. …

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