As Yeltsin Travels, Critics Demand Foreign Policy Review

By Justin Burke, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 24, 1993 | Go to article overview

As Yeltsin Travels, Critics Demand Foreign Policy Review


Justin Burke, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


RUSSIA'S open foreign policy will be put to the test during a two-day Central European tour by President Boris Yeltsin.

Mr. Yeltsin was scheduled to travel to Warsaw today for talks with Polish officials, including President Lech Walesa. He then plans to visit Slovakia and the Czech Republic before returning to Moscow.

Polish, Slovak, and Czech officials hope Yeltsin's visit will stabilize relations among the former Socialist Bloc nations, giving a boost to sagging trade ties. But with Russia's domestic political turmoil apparently spilling over into the foreign policy realm, Yeltsin may be unable to deliver the stability that the Central European nations desire.

Of late, Yeltsin's political opponents have been increasing pressure on his administration to reassess Russia's post-Soviet foreign policy, which has emphasized close cooperation with the West. The nationalist-dominated opposition characterizes that policy as betraying Russia's best interests and has advocated tougher stances on many international issues.

Recent statements and actions by government officials have sent mixed signals regarding Russia's future foreign policy, a possible indication that Yeltsin's ability to maintain the present course may be weakening in the face of growing opposition.

Over the weekend, for example, Moscow suspended the withdrawal of Russian troops stationed in the Baltic republic of Lithuania. A Russian Foreign Ministry statement condemned "continual threats in Lithuania against Russian servicemen," and promised a quick response if the perceived harassment continued. Russia sets its own terms

The troop withdrawal, agreed upon after Lithuania gained independence in 1991, was to have been completed Aug. 31. Of the 30,000-strong Russian force to be withdrawn, about 2,500 are still in Lithuania.

The Russian statement said all troops would eventually leave Lithuania, "but under terms that suit the Russian Federation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

As Yeltsin Travels, Critics Demand Foreign Policy Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.