Virtual-Reality Playground Gives New Meaning to Armchair Travel 'The Other Side' Is an Amusement Park for the Technologically Inclined

By Kirsten A. Conover, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 26, 1993 | Go to article overview

Virtual-Reality Playground Gives New Meaning to Armchair Travel 'The Other Side' Is an Amusement Park for the Technologically Inclined


Kirsten A. Conover, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IMAGINE you're in a futuristic world. Strapped into the front seat of a spaceship, you are launched into a high-speed chase through narrow canyons, cities, and the unknowns of outer space.

It feels real, but it's not.

Welcome to "The Other Side: A Virtual Reality Arena."

Here at Boston's World Trade Center, organizers tout the collection of amusements as the first of its kind, with state-of-the-art equipment in interactive entertainment, motion simulators, virtual-reality attractions, computer-generated environments, and special effects. It can be described as a combination arcade, amusement park, and science museum.

Although such simulation-adventure and virtual-reality games are offered in other places, organizers cite this event - which will begin a national tour in October - as unique.

Rick Velardo just went on a dog sled-snowmobile-bobsled adventure with "Freedom 6," Omni Film's motion-based adventure theater. "It's better than I expected," he says. The wraparound large-format screen, along with the seat platform that sways in sync with the film, makes the experience realistic. "I got sweaty; I didn't know if I was going to make some of those corners!" he says.

Possibly the most popular attraction at "The Other Side" is "Chameleon," an interactive ride that simulates race-car driving and the flying of an F-117 Stealth aircraft, right down to the gravity force.

Marc Ross, chief executive officer of Chameleon Technologies, says the goal is to "experience something that you would not ordinarily be able to experience." So it follows that he's not talking about something as passive as a simulated roller-coaster ride. You drive the race car or fly the F-117 yourself by watching a computerized screen. It feels real.

No wonder. Mr. Ross's parent company - Veda International - has spent nearly 31 years as a contractor for the United States government and the Department of Defense. "The technology that was needed to develop 'Chameleon' came out of some of the technology we developed for fighter pilots - to train them for the military," Ross says. Because of military cutbacks, a handful of companies like Veda are looking toward the leisure-entertainment market to diversify.

"The more realistic the simulator, the better," Ross says, noting that some so-called virtual-reality experiences can get boring if the person eventually figures out what's going to happen next. …

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