Israelis and the PLO Get Down to Business Two Tracks of Palestinian-Autonomy Talks Begin in Egypt

By Stephen Hubbell, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 13, 1993 | Go to article overview

Israelis and the PLO Get Down to Business Two Tracks of Palestinian-Autonomy Talks Begin in Egypt


Stephen Hubbell, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


DEFYING powerful opponents and the formidable burden of history, Israel and the Palestinians are now moving with deliberate speed toward implementing the terms of the autonomy agreement they signed Sept. 13.

As two tracks of talks opened in Egypt Oct. 13, both sides showed a rare determination to stick to the tight, demanding schedule they have set for themselves.

"This is a clear sign that the participants mean business," said one European diplomat of the accelerated pace of events in advance of the Oct. 13 talks. "The political legwork has been done. Now it is time for the politicians to step aside and let the technicians take over."

In advance of the Egypt talks, the Palestine Liberation Organization Central Council met in Tunis late Oct. 11 and voted 63 to 8 to approve the Israeli-PLO agreement. The vote, which followed two days of often acrimonious debate and saw numerous council members resign in protest, represented a major victory for PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat and paved the way for the two tracks of negotiations.

The first track of the talks, opening in Cairo Oct. 13, will monitor progress on the other tracks, including bilateral negotiations scheduled to resume in Washington, and the long-term implementation of the autonomy plan. Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and PLO shuttle-diplomat Mahmoud Abbas, both of whom were active in back-channel negotiations that led to the accord, were expected to lead the two delegations.

Negotiations over the release of most of the 11,500 Palestinian security prisoners now in Israeli jails will be a central feature of the Cairo talks. Israeli Police Minister Moshe Shahal said Oct. 11 that the Israeli prisons service had begun a process of reviewing the files of all Palestinian prisoners in the event of a mass release.

The Israeli press has been reporting that at least 700 prisoners will be freed initially. Israel, however, will seek assurances that hundreds of Palestinian "collaborators," now under Israeli military protection, can safely return to their homes at the same time.

The reports of an impending prisoner release have sparked demonstrations in West Bank streets and prompted some imprisoned Palestinians to desert radical Islamist groups for the PLO, in the hope of winning their freedom.

The second track, set in the resort city of Taba on the Egyptian-Israeli border, will focus on technical aspects of the Israeli military withdrawal from the Gaza Strip and the West Bank city of Jericho.

The Sept. 13 accord requires the Israelis and Palestinians to agree to a timetable for the withdrawal of Israeli forces from Gaza and Jericho by Dec. …

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