Teaching Takes Time

By David D. Newsom. David D. Newsom, former Us undersecretary of state, is Cumming Memorial Professor of International Affairs . | The Christian Science Monitor, October 27, 1993 | Go to article overview

Teaching Takes Time


David D. Newsom. David D. Newsom, former Us undersecretary of state, is Cumming Memorial Professor of International Affairs ., The Christian Science Monitor


A SERIES last month in Virginia newspapers was sharply critical of that state's leading universities, and especially of the University of Virginia, where I now teach. The criticism, widely echoed nationally, centers in part on the teaching load of professors. As one who has come late to an academic career, I feel that the attacks and the faculty responses fail to give the whole picture. The issue centers around the number of hours professors spend in the classroom. To the outsider the average load of two courses, five to six hours a week, seems very light. The response from academicians has been to emphasize the importance of time spent on research.

Certainly the arguments are valid that research can contribute to teaching, that writing is important for professional advancement, and that eminent scholars who are deprived of that opportunity will move to other institutions. What surprises me is that more emphasis is not placed on good teaching.

At the University of Virginia I spend five hours weekly in the classroom. But the remaining hours of what would be considered a normal work week outside academia are more than occupied with essential duties directly related to my responsibilities as a teacher and a member of a faculty. These duties include counseling individual students, writing letters of recommendation, advising graduate students on their theses and dissertations, grading papers, guiding students through independent study programs, preparing for classes, and serving on faculty committees.

At least some of those who believe university faculty are overpaid and under-worked base their criticism on the picture of a professor lecturing from a well-used set of notes to a large group of students and aided by teaching assistants who conduct discussion sessions and grade papers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaching Takes Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.