Why Tolerate Rigged Elections in Gabon? Election Fraud and Supression of Opponents Taunt US Policy of Supporting Democratization

By James M. Prince. James M. Prince is a foreign policy analyst and former member Committee. | The Christian Science Monitor, January 7, 1994 | Go to article overview

Why Tolerate Rigged Elections in Gabon? Election Fraud and Supression of Opponents Taunt US Policy of Supporting Democratization


James M. Prince. James M. Prince is a foreign policy analyst and former member Committee., The Christian Science Monitor


ONLY a month after it began its broadcasts, the independent Radio Frequence Libre in the Central African nation of Gabon was stormed by masked troops who poured acid over the station's equipment. Radio Liberte, the only remaining opposition station, was not destroyed, but its signals are being jammed by the authoritarian government of President El Hadj Omar Bongo.

These actions come in the wake of the strongman declaring victory in the Dec. 5, 1993, elections amid well-founded accusations of electoral fraud.

Since the Clinton administration entered office, United States government officials have debated the parameters of its pro-democratization policy; expectations have risen the world over that this rhetoric would soon become reality. However, dictators around the world will rest somewhat easier knowing that the free world stood idly by as President Bongo flaunted his disrespect for democracy and the electoral process.

The presidential contest in Gabon was riddled with irregularities. Bongo laid claim to a mandate, citing support of 51.1 percent of the popular vote. The American observer team - a 17-member delegation sponsored by the New York-based African-American Institute and funded by US tax dollars - later announced a different analysis.

Polling day, beginning at 8 a.m. in some places and at 4 p.m. in others, was not even good theater. According to a report from the AAI, the counting of results was an even greater debacle: "The {AAI observer} delegation unanimously insists that the arbitrary and ad hoc manner in which the election was administered provided multiple opportunities for the process to be manipulated in a fraudulent manner."

AAI observers "witnessed varied, arbitrary, and selective acceptance of identification" for voting, the report said. Significantly, in opposition strongholds, the AAI noted that many people were barred from voting by stringent adherence to incomplete electoral lists it describes as "worthless."

Now, with a five-year extension to his 26-year regime in hand, Bongo again is forcibly silencing critics and warning opponents that even nonviolent rejection of his reelection is equal to insurrection.

In spite of these events, the world community is meekly accepting the continuation by fraud of one of the world's great kleptocracies.

Government troops subdued by gunfire disturbances that were set off in Gabon's capital, Libreville, by the apparent electoral fraud. Even a public statement by a Bongo-appointed provincial governor, Pauline Nyingone, detailing the regime's fraud was shrugged off by the "reelected" president and ignored by the international community. …

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