Clinton Council Drafts Principles on Development Group Is Charged with Ensuring Economic Growth, Saving Resources

By Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 19, 1994 | Go to article overview

Clinton Council Drafts Principles on Development Group Is Charged with Ensuring Economic Growth, Saving Resources


Mark Trumbull, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


WITH its two-year mission one-fourth over, President Clinton's Council on Sustainable Development "is really still in its formative stages," says David Buzzelli, Dow Chemical's vice president and the council's co-chairman.

Perhaps one reason for the relatively slow start is the monumental nature of the council's task: to develop strategies for allowing the nation's economy to keep growing while protecting the environment and natural resources for future generations.

Jonathan Lash, World Resources Institute president and the council's other chairman, gives an example: The world's farmland, if the best agricultural practices were used, could support 15 billion people eating the minimum amount required, but only 1.4 billion on the diet typical of North America.

Looking at such statistics, some observers ask if the term "sustainable development" is an oxymoron. "Technology just has to be a significant part of that solution," Mr. Buzzelli says.

Mr. Lash is upbeat about the council's progress during last week's meeting in Seattle, calling it the "best" of three held so far. The group - leaders from business, government, labor, civil rights, and environmental organizations - honed "draft principles" describing its goals but spent most of its time learning about how the Pacific Northwest is working to develop a sustainable regional economy. Over the next 18 months, the council will develop recommendations for Mr. Clinton.

Some observers wonder whether the group can achieve the "real results" Clinton has asked for. "That's a danger of any of these commissions," says James Baker, a council member and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator. But he says the group has "the right people," including Cabinet members, to succeed.

Another question is whether Clinton, looking toward the 1996 election, can put a priority on long-term concerns. Working in the council's favor will be the influence of Vice President Al Gore Jr., an environmentalist.

"I'm pleased by the obvious importance that {Mr. Gore} attaches to it," says Denis Hayes, who planned the first Earth Day and now heads an environmental group, the Bullitt Foundation. But he worries about the tendency of such broad-based, consensus-oriented groups to "lean toward the lowest common denominator" in their recommendations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clinton Council Drafts Principles on Development Group Is Charged with Ensuring Economic Growth, Saving Resources
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.