Companies Sing and Dance at New Interest in the Arts

By Guy Halverson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

Companies Sing and Dance at New Interest in the Arts


Guy Halverson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IF anyone doubts that culture in the United States can mean big business, just ask Dennis Hedlund. He has turned a modest $6,500 investment in the publishing of performing art videos into a global company grossing millions of dollars.

Mr. Hedlund is president of Kultur, a West Longbranch, New Jersey-based publisher of videos that range from ballets to concerts, documentaries to operas. His operation is one of a growing number of companies that offer products and services related to the arts as more Americans become interested.

"We live in an age of information and education," says Thomas Black, associate publisher and advertising director of the Smithsonian magazine, published by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The Smithsonian, with a circulation of 2.1 million, is considered one of the more successful "cultural" magazines in the US. According to Mr. Black, demographic studies show that about 72 million Americans over the age of 25 have attended college, up from around 23 million in 1970. This large segment of the population represents 56 percent of the total payroll income in the US, plus slightly more than 70 percent of all discretionary income. Arts-related companies largely target their products at this community, he says.

Still, many people who have not attended college are also avid fans of the arts, he is quick to point out.

This growing community of arts aficionados is reflected by the increasing presence of large multipurpose bookstores throughout the country, which offer not only books, video tapes, and other cultural items for sale, but often provide a coffeehouse within the bookstore.

Arts in the US draw considerable - and increasing - dollar outlays. In terms of paid admissions, about 41 percent of all Americans went to at least one performing-arts related event in 1992, says Tom Bradshaw, a research official with the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington. That is up from 39 percent of all Americans in 1982, Mr. Bradshaw says. About $5. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Companies Sing and Dance at New Interest in the Arts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.