New Orleans Race Takes Curious Twist ELECTION '94

By Garry Boulard, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 4, 1994 | Go to article overview

New Orleans Race Takes Curious Twist ELECTION '94


Garry Boulard, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


MEMBERS of New Orleans' small but politically active Jewish community are expecting anger and confusion in the wake of charges that Donald Mintz (D), a Jew and top candidate for mayor in tomorrow's election, has created and distributed anti-Semitic literature as a fund-raising device.

"It is totally inconceivable that Donald Mintz could ever be involved in something so ugly," said Ann Eisner, the director of the Jewish Community Center.

David Goldstein, the rabbi of Touro Synagogue, where Mr. Mintz frequently worships, is equally vehement: "He is a healer, not a hater. There is just no way on earth he would have anything to do with garbage like this."

Although the source of the hate fliers was discussed during this city's mayoral primary last month, it has only been in the past two weeks that the matter has evolved into a full-blown crisis for Mintz. Not only has his runoff opponent, state Sen. Marc Morial (D) charged that Mintz produced the fliers, but a grand jury has indicted a top Mintz aide for distributing them.

"A lot of weird things can happen in New Orleans politics," said Abner Tritt, the publisher of the local Jewish Voice. "But this one is too bizarre even for me. Mintz could never create this kind of material. His moral standards are too strong. He might have used the copy, though, to raise funds from American Jewry, which is something I have no problem with."

The anonymous fliers were first seen in the city last summer, but by January, more than 100,000 homes had received a series of leaflets and pamphlets steeped in anti-Semitic, anti-black, and anti-gay rhetoric.

"I, for one, am not ready to sit back and dismiss this as `politics as usual,' " said Rabbi Edward Gohn, a member of the city's Human Relations Committee, which is trying to enforce a fair campaign practices agreement signed by the candidates several months ago. "Those fliers not only hurt me with what they say about my black brothers and sisters but also the suggestion that Jews be returned to Auschwitz. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Orleans Race Takes Curious Twist ELECTION '94
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.