Vote in Kazakhstan Yields Controversy Foreign Observers and Opposition Parties Say the Ex-Soviet Republic's First `Democratic Election' Violated International Treaties. Government Officials Deny the Charges

By Wendy Sloane, | The Christian Science Monitor, March 11, 1994 | Go to article overview

Vote in Kazakhstan Yields Controversy Foreign Observers and Opposition Parties Say the Ex-Soviet Republic's First `Democratic Election' Violated International Treaties. Government Officials Deny the Charges


Wendy Sloane,, The Christian Science Monitor


KAZAKHSTAN'S first contested parliamentary elections, in which a clear majority of the seats were won by supporters of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, were unfair and violated international treaties, according to foreign observers and opposition parties.

A delegation of observers from the Council on Security and Cooperation in Europe, said the existence of a "state list" violated CSCE agreements. The delegation criticized the campaign for unfairly disqualifying opposition candidates, curtailing press freedom, denying foreign observers access to some polling stations, and allowing individuals to vote in place of family members.

Karotai Turisov, chairman of the Central Election Commission, sought to play down allegations of foul play in Monday's ballot. He said that SNEK, an acronym for the pro-Nazarbayev Union of People's Unity of Kazakhstan, won more seats than any other party because it legitimately gained more votes.

"We think the elections were fair and democratic," Mr. Turisov said in a telephone interview from Alma Ata, the capital. He added that about 75 percent of the 9.1 million electorate turned up at the polls.

"These observers should keep in mind that democracy is judged by the social-economic level of that country, so you can't compare Kazakhstan with Western Europe," he said. "We voted one way for 70 years, and then they expect us in three months to do everything completely different."

Official results released yesterday showed that SNEK had won 30 seats in the new 177-seat parliament. Independent candidates, most of whom support Mr. Nazarbayev's policies, won 60 seats, while opposition candidates gained only 23. Another 42 seats were direct presidential appointees, while the official Federal Trade Unions took 11 seats. The remaining 11 seats were unclear.

Kazakhstan, a sprawling, resource-rich nation of more than 17 million people, is seeking to establish its claim to be a democracy by holding elections. Its new parliament will replace the former Communist-dominated one, which dissolved itself last December.

Critics have accused Nazarbayev, the former Communist Party chief, of tacitly sanctioning everything from election fraud to personal and ethnic favoritism. …

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Vote in Kazakhstan Yields Controversy Foreign Observers and Opposition Parties Say the Ex-Soviet Republic's First `Democratic Election' Violated International Treaties. Government Officials Deny the Charges
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